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The Long Term Effect of Current and New Interventions on the New Case Detection of Leprosy: A Modeling Study

Abstract

Leprosy is a contagious disease that will remain prevalent, despite the declining number of patients worldwide over the last century. With approximately 250,000 new cases detected annually, leprosy is far from being eradicated. Leprosy can be treated with drugs after disease detection. Some cases can be prevented with a tuberculosis vaccine (BCG) that cross-reacts with the bacterium responsible for leprosy, but this vaccine might be replaced in the future. Furthermore, preventive drugs can reduce the number of new cases among people in contact with infectious patients, but this strategy has not yet become established in common practice. Also, a new test is under development for the detection of infections before the appearance of symptoms. In this study, we used a computer model to assess the effectiveness of seven possible leprosy control activities. Our results showed that the decline in incidence of leprosy would slow down or halt with the introduction of a new tuberculosis vaccine that is ineffective against leprosy. However, this effect could be offset by the implementation of effective tests for early diagnosis or the routine administration of preventative drugs to contacts of patients.

More information

Type
Journal Article
Author
Fischer E
Vlas SJ
Habbema J D
Richardus JH
Country
<p>USA</p>
Year of Publication
2011
Journal
Public Library of Science
Volume
5
Issue
9
Number of Pages
e1330
Date Published
09/2011
Language
eng
DOI
10.1371/journal.pntd.0001330
Alternate Journal
PLoS Negl Trop Dis
Publication Language
eng