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Publication

Factors affecting ability and satisfaction with social roles in persons with neurological conditions: The importance of mobility and stigma.

Abstract

Introduction
The accomplishment of social roles and the satisfaction derived from participating in social roles are two important concepts in occupational therapy. Despite their importance, not much is known about how the two concepts differ. The objective of this study was to explore and compare the clinical and environmental factors correlated with accomplishment and satisfaction in social roles.

Method
This secondary analysis used data from a nested mixed method study. Participants (n  = 88) were Canadian adults, living with a range of neurological conditions. Linear regression analysis was used to identify factors that significantly affected the accomplishment and satisfaction of five social role domains (responsibility, interpersonal relationships, community life, employment and recreation).

Results
The variable of mobility was significantly associated with accomplishment of all five social role domains. Stigma, however, surfaced as the most important variable for satisfaction with social roles. It was significantly associated with all social role domains except employment.

Conclusion
From this analysis it appears that social role accomplishment and satisfaction have distinct correlates. Stigma is an important correlate of social role satisfaction that needs to be understood in more depth and addressed by occupational therapists so individuals with neurological conditions can maximize their satisfaction with social participation.

More information

Type
Journal Article
Author
Warner G
Desrosiers J
Packer T
Stadnyk R
Year of Publication
2018
Journal
The British journal of occupational therapy
Language
eng
Alternate Journal
Br J Occup Ther
Publication Language
eng