How to deal with neglected tropical diseases in the light of an African ethic.

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TitleHow to deal with neglected tropical diseases in the light of an African ethic.
Publication TypeJournal Article
AuthorsMetz T
Abbrev. JournalDev World Bioeth
JournalDeveloping world bioethics
Year of Publication2017
Publication Languageeng
KeywordsAfrican ethic, Ebola, Identity, Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), Positive duties, solidarity, Sub-Saharan morality
Abstract

Many countries in Africa, and more generally those in the Global South with tropical areas, are plagued by illnesses that the wealthier parts of the world (mainly 'the West') neither suffer from nor put systematic effort into preventing, treating or curing. What does an ethic with a recognizably African pedigree entail for the ways various agents ought to respond to such neglected diseases? As many readers will know, a characteristically African ethic prescribes weighty duties to aid on the part of those in a position to do so, and it therefore entails that there should have been much more contribution from the Western, 'developed' world. However, what else does it prescribe, say, on the part of sub-Saharan governments and the African Union, and are they in fact doing it? I particularly seek to answer these questions here, by using the 2013-16 Ebola crisis in West Africa to illustrate what should have happened but what by and large did not.

PubMed URL

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29110410?dopt=Abstract

DOI10.1111/dewb.12179